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This page exists within the Old ArtZone Wiki section of this site. Read the information presented on the linked page to better understand the significance of this fact.

Specular (Highlight) Channel

Now let’s examine the highlight, or specular surface property. In DAZ Studio, the Specular channel controls the color of the highlights in an object. Examples of specular highlights include the bright white glare-spot you might see when sunlight strikes stainless steel, or the faint sheen of human skin.

Glossy materials such as stainless steel show highlights differently than matte surfaces like human skin. For another example, glass usually shows a sharp white highlight when under bright light, whereas polished leather shows a softer sheen.

Basic Tab

The Basic sub-tab displays the following setting options for the Highlight/Specular channel.

  • Highlight|Specular: Click on the Color Selector to open a standard Color Picker and select any color to set as the highlight color.

    Specular Basic tab

Advanced Tab

The Advanced sub-tab allows you to control the amount of specular highlights even further. Adjust glossiness with a slider, for example. You can also use image maps to control the color or strength of the highlights, and use an opacity map to turn off or reduce highlights in transparent or semi-transparent areas.

surftab_specular.jpg

  • Glossiness: This slider controls the size of the highlight. Glossy items usually reflect light in very small areas. The glossier an item is, the smaller the highlight is. A setting of 0% creates an object that has more of a matte finish with wider highlights. A setting of 100% creates an object with a very high gloss finish with smaller, sharper highlights. Drag the slider to the left to decrease the glossiness and right to increase it.
  • Glossiness Image Menu: A Grayscale image can be used to control the strength of the glossiness in your object. The texture selector field is displayed under the Glossiness slider if a texture map or layered image file has been assigned. Click on the field to display a menu where you can select a texture from the list or browse for a new texture. If no texture is assigned, an arrow will be available to the right of the color selector. A menu prompts you to browse for a new image and displays images that are already present in your scene.
  • Color: The color of the highlight can be set to any color. Click on the Color Selector to open a standard Color Picker and select any color to set as the highlight color.
  • Color Image Menu: To assign a texture map to control the color of the highlight, click on the field to display a menu where you can select a texture from the list or browse for a new texture. If no texture is assigned, an arrow will be available to the right of the color selector. A menu prompts you to browse for a new image and displays images that are already present in your scene.
  • Strength: This slider controls the strength of the highlight, or how strongly the highlight appears. A setting of 0% means no highlight, while 100% means a bright highlight.
  • Strength Image Menu: When assigning a texture map for finer control over how your material reacts to light, grayscale images are recommended, with black areas equaling a setting of 0% and white areas equaling a setting of 100%. Shades of gray will pass values between 0 and 100%, depending on how dark or light they are. To assign a texture map to control the Specular Strength, click on the field to display a menu where you can select a texture from the list or browse for a new texture. If no texture is assigned, an arrow will be available to the right of the color selector. A menu prompts you to browse for a new image and displays images that are already present in your scene.
  • Multiply Through Opacity: This toggle causes the Specular strength to be multiplied by the opacity strength. Turn this option on if you have a fully transparent (0% opaque) surface that should not cast highlights. Turn this option off for transparent surfaces that are glossy, such as camera lenses, corneas, glasses, and so on.