User Tools

Site Tools


This page exists within the Old ArtZone Wiki section of this site. Read the information presented on the linked page to better understand the significance of this fact.

QuickTime virtual tours with Bryce 5

Author: babio1946

Tools Needed

  • Bryce 5
  • GoCubic (Freeware)

Support Files

Introduction

Many 3D graphic programs can output a QTVR file; one of the most used among the shareware is Terragen.

Thus I developed a procedure to have the same files with Bryce 5. One of the methods to obtain a virtual tour starts with 6 renders each covering 90 degrees horizontal by 90 degrees vertical, oriented to the 6 faces of a cube; then continues turning those renders, by means of a suitable program, into a QTVR.

Programs like Terragen can be automated by a script that produces the 6 renders; the explained procedure gets over the drawback of Bryce, that is not scriptable; I used an animation instead, with 6 frames corresponding to the 6 needed positions of the camera.

400-02d71.jpg

Step 1 - SETUP THE SCENE

400-02d81.jpg

I suggest to download the support file TestAnim.br5, corresponding to the pictures of the following directions.

The 6 renders have to coincide with the 6 faces of an hypothetic cube, so they must be square. You can work on a window of 400 x 400 pixel, or 600 x 600 (menu File - > Document Setup…); for the first test I suggest to reduce the Render Resolution to 1 : 0.50 or 1 : 0.25, and to select Quality - > Default (No AA) in the menu Control - > Render Options. When all is correct, you can increase the Resolution and the Quality Mode. Be careful: the rendering times will increase more then proportionally!

Remember that we will use an animation only as a substitute of a script; so be careful to keep fixed all the elements of the scene (except the camera). A particular attention must be paid to the clouds, because by default they have a Cloud Motion value different from zero, and to the sun.

400-02d91.jpg

Therefore select the Sky and Fog Palette and unselect “Link Sun to View”; then click on Sky Lab… and select the Cloud Cover tab.

400-02da1.jpg

Set the Cloud Motion speed to 0; later, when the Animation is setted, verify that all the parameters be the same for all the 6 frames.

Now put the Camera in a suitable position among the points of interest of the scene, so that rotating it in all the 6 fundamental directions you can see them all.

Step 2 - SETUP OF THE ANIMATION

400-02db1.jpg

Because we must have 6 frames, from menu File - > Animation Setup set the Frames Per Second to 1 and the Duration to 05 seconds; select a Frame Count Display.

Click the Time/Selection Palette Toggle icon in the bottom right of the working area, and bring up the Time Palette.

Set the the animation to Frame 0, either clicking the To Start icon in the Animation Preview Controls, or dragging the Current Time Indicator Cursor in the Timeline.

Step 3 - SETUP OF THE CAMERA

400-02dc1.jpg

From the Control View Options… select From Top view.

400-02dd1.jpg

From the Select Options… select the camera.

400-02de1.jpg

Click the A icon to set the Camera attributes.

Step 4 - SETUP OF THE 6 FRAMES

400-02df1.jpg

A fundamental problem of Bryce is that the camera FOV (field of view) is not at all accurate, so setting a FOV of 90 makes a shot lesser than 90 degrees horizontal by 90 degrees vertical; in other words, the rendered view does not cover all the face of the cube, so that at the seams of the faces the details of the scene do not match.

The best setting that I found after many tries is a FOV of 112, 5 degrees.

Verifying to be at Frame 0, set the three Rotate parameters to 0, and FOV to 112, 50. Scale must be 100, Pan V and Pan H must be 0. The other parameters outside the red frame in the picture (Origin and Position) obviously are not to be changed, because they are the Absolute Coordinates that come from the position of the Camera, relative to the scene.

Jump to Frame 1, either clicking the Next Key Frame icon in the Animation Preview Controls, or dragging the Current Time Indicator Cursor in the Timeline, then click the A icon to set the Camera attributes, changing the Y Rotate to 90.

400-02e01.jpg

In the same manner jump to frames 2, 3,

400-02e11.jpg

4, 5, setting the parameters as shown.

At the end of this procedure you have set the rotation of the camera according to the following table:

Frame X Y Z View

0 0 0 0 Front

1 0 90 0 Right

2 0 180 0 Back

3 0 270 0 Left

4 -90 0 0 Top

5 90 0 0 Bottom

Step 5 - VERIFY THE ANIMATION

Select again the Sky and Fog Palette, click on Sky Lab, and select the Cloud Cover tab; switching from Frame 0 to the following ones, verify that all the parameters are the same for all 6 frames.

In the Control NanoPreview Options, select Camera View.

Reset the animation to Frame 0. Click the Play icon in the Animation Preview Controls: in the From Top View you must see the Camera switching from the first position (with the FOV pointing upwards) to the second, third, fourth, fith and sixth.

400-02e21.jpg

Reset the animation to Frame 0, and look at the NanoPreview. You must see the front image. Click subsequently the Next Key Frame icon in the Animation Preview Controls and verify that, switching to frames 1, 2, and so on, the Scene in the Nano Preview window changes according to the above table.

400-02e31.jpg

From the Control View Options, select Camera view.

Step 6 - RENDER THE ANIMATION

400-02e41.jpg

I suggest to reduce first the Render Resolution and Quality, as explained in Step 1; only if all is OK, increase the Resolution and the Quality Mode, and restart the rendering.

From the File menu, select Render Animation, and choose Output Module: BMP Sequence.

400-02e51.jpg

Then click the Set File Location button

400-02e61.jpg

and select a folder and a file name for the first BitMap. Bryce will save the subsequent 5 renders, incrementing the file name by 1. So, if the first filename is 10000BMP, the second will be 10001BMP, and the sixth will be 10005BMP.

Finally click the V shaped icon in the Render Animation Dialog; Bryce will render the 6 images in sequence.

When the the sixth image is completed, normally Bryce will open it in the default graphic application installed on the computer (for my computer, PaintShop8).

Now you can transform the sequence in a panoramic QTVR view.

Step 7 - SETUP THE PANORAMIC VIEW

400-02e71.jpg

Launch GoCubic and select the item Make Pano Movie from the Make Pano menu.

400-02e81.jpg

Go to the folder where the 6 bitmaps were created and select the first one. Click on Open,

400-02e91.jpg

then choose a name (default.mov, or another of your choice) and click on Save.

Step 8 - ENJOY THE PANORAMIC VIEW...

400-02ea1.jpg

After a few seconds, the final QTVR Movie is ready. You can close GoCubic and reopen the movie file in QuickTime from the related folder.

Generally the results are acceptable; only in a few events (like building interiors) the details of the scene at the seams of the faces will not match. Better results are obtainable with landscapes, and when the camera is not too close to the nearest objects.

I hope that these directions will be useful; have a good work!