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Switching Camera in Poser

Author: DanaC78

Tools Needed

* Poser

Introduction

For those who played with Vue 5 Infinite in animating, they probably know what I am talking about. For the uninitiated, this is a method of change a point of view on the timeline so in one animation render, you get all the different angles you wish that before required you to understand Editing software. However, this method is not available in Poser, so it is a little discouraging. However, like a lot of things, there is a trick that can be employed to simulate the effect. The only difference between Vue 5i, and Poser is that in Poser, we will only be using 1 camera. I know you must think I am mad, but bear with me, this will save hard drive space that would otherwise be filled with multiple takes in different angles. It will also save you time in rendering cause you don't have to start stop start stop. Press that render button, and let it fly! :) One disclaimer: This is meant for those who are familiar with Poser Animation.

Step 1: Creating the Animation

This step depends on your skill of setting up animation with your character, and scene. Since Basic Animation escapes the scope of this tutorial, I shall refrain from expanding too much on it.

For the sake of exercise, create sixty frames in the timeline bar towards the bottom. You can use any amount of frames for this method, this is just an exercise.

The next part of this step is to create motion. At frame 1, pose your figure. At frame 30, pose the figure again, and repeat at 60. This should give you enough motion in the character to complete this step.:) Moving on.

Step 2: Working with the Time Line Editor

200-001b.jpg

What we need right now is the time line editor. If you have the timebar open like it was in Step 1, you will see a little key-like icon that looks like the thing in red . Click on that and you will get:

If this is the first time you seen this editor, don't panic. You might even be able to use the techniques I will go over in other facets of animation.:) In here, you will see every keyframe ever made up to this point.

200-001c.jpg

For this exercise, we will be using the dolly camera. Click on the word, and it will highlight it, then we are ready to have some fun.:)

Step 3: Setting up Switching Cameras in Time Line Editor

200-001d.jpg

I know after looking at the Keyframe options (spline, linear, constant, break-spline), you are probably worried right now “Which one do I use?”

200-001e.jpg

I will tell you what you shouldn't use, and that is Spline (the green one with waves). The reason for this despite the fact it will be in the EXACT same position, it will try to transition between the two keyframes with what Poser THINKS you are doing. For instance, say you set Camera at point in Key 1 and 30, and the angle and position exactly identical. Rotation, it will take your rotation of 180 (for sake of explanation), go to 1 at frame 15, and then go back to 180. Yea, that yucky. I often avoid using it.

200-001d.jpg

So for camera switching, I would recommend using Linear and Constant. Constant will remain the same till there is a change, and Linear will animate from one point to the next. If there are no changes between Frame 1 to 30, then nothing will happen, but Linear gives you the option of animating the camera whereas constant will not. Depends what you want to do.

Moving on.

What I would like you to do now is to create the first keyframe. Frame 1 is already created, so go to frame 30, and create a keyframe by clicking on either the Linear Box or the Constant.. So Dolly Camera will go from Frame 1 to Frame 30 to animate the camera, although nothing happening (unless of course you want to and selected Linear;) In which case, use frame 30 to move, swerve, whatever to the camera that will show on screen. Back to topic:)).

What I would like you to do now is to create the first keyframe. Frame 1 is already created, so go to frame 30, and create a keyframe by clicking on either the Linear Box or the Constant.. So Dolly Camera will go from Frame 1 to Frame 30 to animate the camera, although nothing happening (unless of course you want to and selected Linear;)).

The next part of this step, is the next keyframe, frame 31. I want you to select it, and add a keyframe there. You should see something that looks like this:

200-001f.jpg

Now you can close the Timeline editor for now by clicking on the tiny grey box on the upper left hand corner while keeping frame while keeping frame 31 highlighted on the Dolly Camera for the next step.

Step 4: The Switcher-Roo

This is really a shorter step then Step 3, I promise.

What I would like you to do is to move the camera to a different position. I trust you know how to do this in your version of Poser.:)

Now what I would like you to do: Click on the Play on the Animation Box at the bottom. Watch what happens. By the time it gets to frame 31, notice the change? WOOHOO! The beauty of it is: You can do this multiple times. The only reason I had you do 60 frames is to give you enough frames to look at the effect. Now imagine the rendering.;) As long as the dolly camera (or any camera you choose after this point) is selected, the animation render will go through with it.

Step 5: Further Note

This is more side note then an actual step. The gist of this tutorial was covered in those four steps. For those with Premiere, Vegas, or any other Video Editing Programs, this is where this gets very useful. You might notice it gets a little sharp in transition between frames 30 to frame 31. I understand that. However, you could break apart these in your editing program, and create multiple events based on ONE file, instead of having file after file, after file.

This is really all there is to it. Happy huntin..:)